Date   

Information on how to get (and use) an experimental node assignment

David Cameron - IRLP
 

Experimental node numbers assignment:

In order to obtain and use an experimental IRLP node number, I
require:

1) Your name
2) Your callsign
3) Your IP address (static) or fully qualified hostname (no-ip.org
etc) **SEE NOTE**
4) What IRLP codec you would like the IRLP nodes that connect to use,
and if full duplex
5) Whether you want DTMF tones to be muted or not.
6) What current IRLP nodes you own or maintain
7) What your planned use of the experimental node is (software used,
etc).

Send this information to experimental@..., not to my address.

In return, I will add you to the list of experimental nodes, which is
contained in the exp-x-reference file.

In order to participate in the experimental node system,
participating nodes must add the following flag to their environment
file:

export ALLOW_EXPERIMENTAL_NODES=YES

Nodes who do not add this will get a "node does not exist" when they
try and call.

The IRLP files that have changed or been added:

scripts/decode - added the ability to split out the 0000-0999 as
experimental
scripts/exp-x-reference - the file that contains all the IP/host info
scripts/experimental_call - the script that sets up the calls

These will be automatically updated tonight, or you can manually
force an update.

The call that is made is the same call that is made to the echo
reflector. No verification of the identity of the node, no ping, and
no TCP connection is made.

Limitations -

1) Only one assignment per callsign at first. Once the demand has
been determined, others will be allowed if available.
2) No updates to the entries will be made once set, so verify the
info is correct.
3) There will be no status reporting on the IRLP status page, except
that IRLP nodes will show they are connected to 0010 for example.
4) IRLP reserves the right to remove these experimental assignments
at any time, for any reason
5) No requests for specific numbers - they will be assigned in order.

**NOTE** - If you think that your node's IP will change, get a
dynamic DNS hostname setup. I will not be updating the exp-x-
reference file after setup.

Dave Cameron
VE7LTD


Re: Some new setups for experimenters - ref99XX

 

At 10:37 AM 2/2/2009, you wrote:

On Feb 1, 2009, at 3:13 PM, Tony Langdon, VK3JED wrote:

At 05:50 AM 2/2/2009, you wrote:

I'll take you up on this offer.

I'll use the hostname irlp.vkradio.com for the experimental system.
There are some changes coming down the pike. I'll let Dave provide
details when appropriate. I promised him I'd shut up ;-)
Hmm, I meant to email that directly to Dave... oops. :(

73 de VK3JED / VK3IRL
http://vkradio.com


Re: Some new setups for experimenters - ref99XX

Randy Hammock <rhammock@...>
 

On Feb 1, 2009, at 3:13 PM, Tony Langdon, VK3JED wrote:

At 05:50 AM 2/2/2009, you wrote:

I'll take you up on this offer.

I'll use the hostname irlp.vkradio.com for the experimental system.
There are some changes coming down the pike. I'll let Dave provide details when appropriate. I promised him I'd shut up ;-)

Thanks.


73 de VK3JED / VK3IRL
http://vkradio.com
--
Randy Hammock KC6HUR
http://kc6hur.net/~rhammock/
http://irlp.kc6hur.net/
If there are no horses in heaven, then when I die, I want to go where they went.


Re: Some new setups for experimenters - ref99XX

 

At 05:50 AM 2/2/2009, you wrote:

I'll take you up on this offer.

I'll use the hostname irlp.vkradio.com for the experimental system.

Thanks.


73 de VK3JED / VK3IRL
http://vkradio.com


Some new setups for experimenters - ref99XX

David Cameron - IRLP
 

As part of the discussions that have been going around about nodes
that allow crosslinks, and the need to experiment, I have decided to
open up a range of numbers of experimental nodes that can be called
from an IRLP node. They will use no PGP authentication, and will just
be like a connection to the IRLP echo reflector. They will be
callable from ANY irlp node, and you can lock them out as you would
any other node.

This satisfies the needs of the guidelines, as the IRLP nodes have to
voluntarily connect.

There will be a warning created and uploaded to nodes that these are
experimental numbers. The warning will be "quietable" by adding an
environment flag.

The codes from 9900 through 9989 will be set aside for this.

As a developer/experimenter, you will have to provide me with a
static IP (or) a dynamic DNS entry you want the connection pointed
to. No audio files will be supported, except the reflector 9 9 0 0
linkon.

These will be assigned first come-first serve basis. Please email me
directly with requests. The code to do this should be in place within
a week.

Dave Cameron
VE7LTD


Re: Node 4527 WA2EPI

Nate Duehr <nate@...>
 

He says he found this bug and it's fixed.

--
Nate Duehr

On Jan 28, 2009, at 13:27, "Nate Duehr" <nate@...> wrote:

I've sent a note to the DBA.

Nate WY0X

-----Original Message-----
From: irlp@... [mailto:irlp@...] On Behalf Of Dave
Gingrich
Sent: Wednesday, January 28, 2009 5:20 AM
To: irlp@...
Subject: Re: [irlp] Re: Node 4527 WA2EPI


On Jan 28, 2009, at 6:59, Mark Phillips wrote:

So in other words we've been administratively dropped?
No, I don't think so. There is a technical problem in the database.
"Administratively" implies intentionally. In your case though, it is
an error that will have to be fixed. Not your fault, nor is there
anything you can do about it. The field in the DB record Jim is
referring to, is not available to node owners. The DB admin (n0psr)
will have to take a look at it.

The status page has nothing to do with the actual operation of the
network, it is simply a monitoring tool.

-k9dc


On Wed, 2009-01-28 at 02:03 +0000, Jim WW4M wrote:
There is a status page database setting not visible to node owners
that determines whether the node shows up on the list. Values are
Yes,
No, and Delisted for No Response. 4527 is set for Delisted, but I am
unable to manually change it as I can for nodes that are not Delisted
(the drop-down box is about 1-char in size with no values to pick
from).

Jim WW4M
------------------------------------

--- IRLP-Owners YahooGroups List ---Yahoo! Groups Links





------------------------------------

--- IRLP-Owners YahooGroups List ---Yahoo! Groups Links



Re: Heat shutdown

Mike Morris WA6ILQ <wa6ilq@...>
 

At 12:04 PM 01/31/09, you wrote:

James Nessen wrote:
Yup, lm_sensors is what you're looking for. I have a few nodes here that
are lucky to have this, a simple script to extract what you need and
you're all set.
And if you're really bored with your IRLP box, setup lm_sensors and MRTG
then you'll have nice graphs of temperature, voltage, network traffic, ect.

--
Jason Stahls
VA3JSS
And if you want to write an article on how to incorporate it into the box
(maybe add a couple more buttons to the web-based admin tools?)
the IRLP web page at repeater-builder has LOTS of room....

Mike WA6ILQ


Re: Heat shutdown

Jim WW4M
 

It seems this thread isn't really related specifically to IRLP. Can it
be taken off-list? There are 3,203 people subscribed to the list for
discussion of IRLP issues.

Thanks,

Jim WW4M


Re: Heat shutdown

 

At 06:32 AM 2/1/2009, you wrote:
Some locations exceeded 45C/113F (outside) and diurnal cooling wasn't much
better according to many sources. I didn't see what the system temps were
I was in one of those locations...

but with limited cooling, were likely well into the ouch range for chips.
As we know, computers don't like that and show their displeasure by
quitting, forever. They also trash hard drives on their way out. The
larger issue was that the power grid was shut down for protection, which
would limit shack/vault ability to cool too (no a/c on battery).
I tend to be conservative about thermal issues, after having studied the effects of heat on the longevity of solid state devices many years ago - basically, it drastically shortens the lifespan of a circuit.

73 de VK3JED / VK3IRL
http://vkradio.com


Re: Heat shutdown

 

At 06:17 AM 2/1/2009, you wrote:
How hot did it get down there? Some of my repeater sites have reached 120F inside during the summer months, but I've designed the systems to handle it. What was the ambient temp near the node equipment?
In my case, they exceeded 42C (108F) at times. I am also conservative about operating temperatures, probably try to run cooler than most (promotes longevity). In addition, I was also trying to minimise the heat load, as running the PC, and the radio's higher duty cycle would have increased the temperature even more.

73 de VK3JED / VK3IRL
http://vkradio.com


Re: Heat shutdown

Jason Stahls
 

James Nessen wrote:
Yup, lm_sensors is what you're looking for. I have a few nodes here that
are lucky to have this, a simple script to extract what you need and
you're all set.
And if you're really bored with your IRLP box, setup lm_sensors and MRTG then you'll have nice graphs of temperature, voltage, network traffic, ect.

--
Jason Stahls
VA3JSS


Re: Heat shutdown

Rick Bates <HappyMoosePhoto@...>
 

Some locations exceeded 45C/113F (outside) and diurnal cooling wasn't much
better according to many sources. I didn't see what the system temps were
but with limited cooling, were likely well into the ouch range for chips.
As we know, computers don't like that and show their displeasure by
quitting, forever. They also trash hard drives on their way out. The
larger issue was that the power grid was shut down for protection, which
would limit shack/vault ability to cool too (no a/c on battery).

Rick WA6NHC

www.HappyMoosePhoto.com

Wildlife and scenic images

_____

From: irlp@... [mailto:irlp@...] On Behalf Of
kk2ed@...
Sent: Saturday, January 31, 2009 11:18 AM
To: irlp@...
Subject: [irlp] Re: Heat shutdown



How hot did it get down there? Some of my repeater sites have reached 120F
inside during the summer months, but I've designed the systems to handle it.
What was the ambient temp near the node equipment?

Eric
KE2D


Re: Heat shutdown

Rick Bates <HappyMoosePhoto@...>
 

All great input, thanks.

But as an older styled ham, I was likely going about it the wrong way and
re-inventing the wheel. To be specific (and having never made a thermistor
circuit), I figured that the UPS driver (already available) monitors one
line (serial port) from the UPS that basically says to the computer "Hey,
the power is off and the battery is getting low, time to quit".

A sensor (thermistor or LM or whatever) could be simply installed in the
outbound air flow of the power supply (or bonded to the case of a p/s for
fan failure test) so that when the temp was above XX degrees, it toggled the
same line that the UPS would use. Using the internal LM sensors would add
more protection (if available) and could trip a script telling the local
user "Hey, I've got a problem here" as well as shutdown when a threshold was
crossed.

In fact, a power supply fan failing would be more common than the obscene
temps those 'down unda' have been going through, but the reasoning is the
same. Rather than adding fans to move more hot air (hmm, political?) when
temps reach a certain point, shutdown is the only sure way to save the gear.

Am I on the right track here?

Rick

www.HappyMoosePhoto.com

Wildlife and scenic images

_____

From: irlp@... [mailto:irlp@...] On Behalf Of Dave
Schultheis
Sent: Saturday, January 31, 2009 10:27 AM
To: irlp@...
Subject: Re: [irlp] Heat shutdown



Mike WA6ILQ wrote:

FWIW there are automatic fans that have a thermistor in the air stream,
_<snip>


Re: Heat shutdown

kk2ed@...
 

How hot did it get down there? Some of my repeater sites have reached 120F inside during the summer months, but I've designed the systems to handle it. What was the ambient temp near the node equipment?

Eric
KE2D


Re: Heat shutdown

Dave Schultheis
 

Mike WA6ILQ wrote:


FWIW there are automatic fans that have a thermistor in the air stream,
and adjust the fan speed based on that thermistor. If you motherboard
has an extra three-terminal fan connector you could mount one of those
fans in the back wall of the computer case and read the speed of that
fan the same way that SpeedFan does.
Here is one manufacturer:
<http://www.amazon.com/Thermltake-Variable-Speed-Thermal-Control/dp/B0000DK6G8>

Here is another fan that might be useful:

http://www.buyextras.com/sysexfanwitt.html

There is no information on that page about the connector it uses, and I am having difficulty finding the manufacturer's page, but it looks like a good unit.


73 Dave WB6KHP
San Jose

--

dave6592 [at] accesscom [dot] com - http://www.accesscom.com/~dave6592
Dave Schultheis, San Jos�, Silicon Valley, Santa Clara County, CA, USA


Re: Heat shutdown

Mike Morris WA6ILQ <wa6ilq@...>
 

At 04:35 AM 01/31/09, you wrote:

There are sensors on board most CPU's these days, here on my Windows box I
am running a programme called SpeedFan and it show several different
temperature readings in the computer.

So it may well be able to write a script to monitor these settings and if
they go over a set reading it could play a shut down message over the air
and send an email out to the Node Owner and then automatically shut down.
If these settings for the temperature readings is available in Linux then no
hardware mods should be necessary.
FWIW there are automatic fans that have a thermistor in the air stream,
and adjust the fan speed based on that thermistor. If you motherboard
has an extra three-terminal fan connector you could mount one of those
fans in the back wall of the computer case and read the speed of that
fan the same way that SpeedFan does.

Here is one manufacturer:
<http://www.amazon.com/Thermltake-Variable-Speed-Thermal-Control/dp/B0000DK6G8>

--
The views I present are that of my own and NOT of any organisation I may
belong to.

73 de Simon, VK3XEM.
Mike WA6ILQ


Re: Heat shutdown

Rick Bates <HappyMoosePhoto@...>
 

Ok, thank you.

Since some mboards (remember we're using older stock here) do not have the
sensors (or user access to them) I was thinking more along the lines of an
external device for overheat (the air around the system) as well as the
usual power outage (UPS). It could be as simple as a thermistor circuit
pulling a line low. A similar feature for repeater controllers could reduce
the power output, kick on extra fans, scream for help or similar event (some
use the alarm feature for this).

Of course using 'shutdown -h now' would mean a trip to the site unless you
can remotely cycle the power, but that's not always a bad thing if something
caused this type of shutdown. You'd likely want to check for damage anyway.

Rick

www.HappyMoosePhoto.com

Wildlife and scenic images

_____

From: irlp@... [mailto:irlp@...] On Behalf Of Simon
Templar
Sent: Saturday, January 31, 2009 4:36 AM
To: irlp@...
Subject: Re: [irlp] Heat shutdown



There are sensors on board most CPU's these days, here on my Windows box I
am running a programme called SpeedFan and it show several different
temperature readings in the computer.

So it may well be able to write a script to monitor these settings and if
they go over a set reading it could play a shut down message over the air
and send an email out to the Node Owner and then automatically shut down.
If these settings for the temperature readings is available in Linux then no
hardware mods should be necessary.


Re: Heat shutdown

James Nessen <nessenj@...>
 

Yup, lm_sensors is what you're looking for. I have a few nodes here that
are lucky to have this, a simple script to extract what you need and
you're all set.

Jim K6JWN

On Sat, January 31, 2009 4:35 am, Simon Templar wrote:
There are sensors on board most CPU's these days, here on my Windows box I
am running a programme called SpeedFan and it show several different
temperature readings in the computer.

So it may well be able to write a script to monitor these settings and if
they go over a set reading it could play a shut down message over the air
and send an email out to the Node Owner and then automatically shut down.
If these settings for the temperature readings is available in Linux then
no
hardware mods should be necessary.

On 1/31/09, Rick Bates <HappyMoosePhoto@...> wrote:

Welcome back folks down unda.

A thought occurred to me during your shutdown. Has someone configured a
system to automatically shut a system down for an outside emergency
(heat
being one cause)? I was thinking that the UPS (serial port or perhaps
USB)
driver could be used to trip a command (i.e. 'shutdown -h now') and
protect
the computer equipment.

Rick WA6NHC


--
The views I present are that of my own and NOT of any organisation I may
belong to.

73 de Simon, VK3XEM.







--


Re: Heat shutdown

Simon Templar <groups@...>
 

There are sensors on board most CPU's these days, here on my Windows box I
am running a programme called SpeedFan and it show several different
temperature readings in the computer.

So it may well be able to write a script to monitor these settings and if
they go over a set reading it could play a shut down message over the air
and send an email out to the Node Owner and then automatically shut down.
If these settings for the temperature readings is available in Linux then no
hardware mods should be necessary.

On 1/31/09, Rick Bates <HappyMoosePhoto@...> wrote:

Welcome back folks down unda.

A thought occurred to me during your shutdown. Has someone configured a
system to automatically shut a system down for an outside emergency (heat
being one cause)? I was thinking that the UPS (serial port or perhaps USB)
driver could be used to trip a command (i.e. 'shutdown -h now') and protect
the computer equipment.

Rick WA6NHC
--
The views I present are that of my own and NOT of any organisation I may
belong to.

73 de Simon, VK3XEM.


Heat shutdown

Rick Bates <HappyMoosePhoto@...>
 

Welcome back folks down unda.

A thought occurred to me during your shutdown. Has someone configured a
system to automatically shut a system down for an outside emergency (heat
being one cause)? I was thinking that the UPS (serial port or perhaps USB)
driver could be used to trip a command (i.e. 'shutdown -h now') and protect
the computer equipment.

Rick WA6NHC

www.HappyMoosePhoto.com

Wildlife and scenic images