Date   

Re: hint...

Jim MacKenzie
 

TP-Link has some interesting little boxes that will let you use a USB cellular modem and bridge it to wired or wireless Ethernet connections.  I use one on my nano-node sometimes (I also use a dedicated WiFi hotspot sometimes too).  They’re pretty cheap and work quite well.  You’d need some sort of compact single-board computer to be the node (well anything would work but if you want portability, small is best).

 

Jim VE5EIS

 

From: irlp@... [mailto:irlp@...]
Sent: October-19-15 5:03 PM
To: irlp@...
Subject: Re: [irlp] hint...

 

 


The current models are based on NetBSD Unix based I think. You can SSH into them and apply many of command line skills you learned on your node. Unfortunately, Cradlepoint has been slowly moving out of the lower end consumer lines, into the enterprise markets. They have discontinued nearly all of their lower end products and moved to a subscription support model. Frankly, not great for us.


Re: hint...

Dave K9DC
 

The current models are based on NetBSD Unix based I think. You can SSH into them and apply many of command line skills you learned on your node. Unfortunately, Cradlepoint has been slowly moving out of the lower end consumer lines, into the enterprise markets. They have discontinued nearly all of their lower end products and moved to a subscription support model. Frankly, not great for us.

-k9dc

On Oct 19, 2015, at 17:43, 'va3xjl@gmail.com' va3xjl@gmail.com [irlp] <irlp@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

Many thanks Dave. The Cradlepoint products fave a lot of functions, including how to make it work with AT commands. Remember those?

Cheers!
John VA3XJL


Re: hint...

John Lorenc
 

Many thanks Dave. The Cradlepoint products fave a lot of functions, including how to make it work with AT commands. Remember those?

Cheers!

John VA3XJL

Sent from my iPad Air 2

On Oct 19, 2015, at 1:12 PM, Dave Gingrich Dave@dcg.us [irlp] <irlp@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


On Oct 19, 2015, at 12:01, 'va3xjl@gmail.com' va3xjl@gmail.com [irlp] <irlp@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

Hi
Just wondering if you can expect a wire tethered Android phone to work with the Cradlepoint USB port?
John VA3XJL
Sent from my iPad Air 2


You would need to check the Cradlepoint device compatibility list to see if it is possible. Then your cell plan to see if it is covered.

You would still have to overcome the lack of a public IP address and/or the cellco firewall blocking IRLP incoming traffic (depends on your carrier). You could probably get around that with a VPN connection, for another monthly fee, assuming your cell connection was very solid and did not change IPs on you every few hours.

But why would anyone want to tie up a perfectly good cell phone 24/7 to operate an IRLP node? Remember, once you install IRLP, it is supposed to be left running. Yes, you can turn it off for short periods of time, but IRLP was intended to be left running continuously, just like your local repeater. It was not meant to turn it on intermittently, then shut off when you are not using it.

My main point was, it makes no sense to even try this maneuver using any tethered phone and hack it, when you can buy a modem for cheap, and use the router the way it was intended. Most routers even provide cabled ethernet out.

-k9dc





------------------------------------
Posted by: Dave Gingrich <Dave@dcg.us>
------------------------------------

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Fw: new message

Joe
 

Hello!

 

New message, please read http://cokince.net/master.php

 

jgonzalez@...


Ralink 3062

Kirby Kirby
 

After a few years of being perfectly happy using wired ethernet, I am
having to move my IRLP node and start using __WiFi__!!!

I purchased some WiFi PCI cards and have them working just fine on my
Fedora boxen, but I not so on my IRLP node. Before I jump down some
rabbit hole involving module building and such, does anyone have a
quick-and-dirty procedure.

To complicate matters, I haven't done anything with Debian since Mr.
Murdock was involved.

--


Re: hint...

Dave K9DC
 

On Oct 19, 2015, at 12:01, 'va3xjl@gmail.com' va3xjl@gmail.com [irlp] <irlp@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

Hi
Just wondering if you can expect a wire tethered Android phone to work with the Cradlepoint USB port?
John VA3XJL
Sent from my iPad Air 2


You would need to check the Cradlepoint device compatibility list to see if it is possible. Then your cell plan to see if it is covered.

You would still have to overcome the lack of a public IP address and/or the cellco firewall blocking IRLP incoming traffic (depends on your carrier). You could probably get around that with a VPN connection, for another monthly fee, assuming your cell connection was very solid and did not change IPs on you every few hours.

But why would anyone want to tie up a perfectly good cell phone 24/7 to operate an IRLP node? Remember, once you install IRLP, it is supposed to be left running. Yes, you can turn it off for short periods of time, but IRLP was intended to be left running continuously, just like your local repeater. It was not meant to turn it on intermittently, then shut off when you are not using it.

My main point was, it makes no sense to even try this maneuver using any tethered phone and hack it, when you can buy a modem for cheap, and use the router the way it was intended. Most routers even provide cabled ethernet out.

-k9dc


Re: hint...

John Lorenc
 

Hi

Just wondering if you can expect a wire tethered Android phone to work with the Cradlepoint USB port?

John VA3XJL

Sent from my iPad Air 2

On Oct 19, 2015, at 1:00 AM, Dave Gingrich Dave@dcg.us [irlp] <irlp@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


I do not think tethering your iPhone to an IRLP node is very feasible. Even if you arranged for a static public IP on the iPhone (possible with Verizon at least), I do not believe there is a way to get the iPhone itself to forward the necessary ports to the IRLP node.

I have had excellent success using a USB modem with a static public IP from Verizon, on a Cradlepoint router. The Cradlepoint offers several different port forwarding methods. It has an ethernet port and is much less expensive than dedicating an iPhone 6 to your IRLP node 24/7.

I have 2 iPads with Verizon static public IPs on them, but there is no way to turn the iPad into a port forwarding router as far as I know. [Once you pay Verizon the $500, there is no limit on the number of devices you can set up with the feature. So I did it as an exercise just to learn how to set up an iOS device to do that. But honestly, there is little value to me in actually having a static public IP on my iPads.]

If you are willing to pay the $500, I would recommend getting a straight USB modem and a compatible router. But beware, not all modems are compatible with all routers. I am using a Pantech UML290 LTE modem with a Cradlepoint CBR400 and an MBR95 (both discontinued I believe). You can purchase the UML290 all day long on Ebay for around $25.

-k9dc


On Oct 17, 2015, at 13:34, Eli Aguirre omegan6xpg@yahoo.com [irlp] <irlp@yahoogroups.com> wrote:



Hi there node owners:
Name here, Eli Aguirre N6XPG.
I'm new in this fascinating world of irlp and really interesting to know more about it.
Wonder if any body can give me a hint to pair my iphone 6 in to my node, to be able using in
on my mobile.

Some body toll me that getting the format of STONG VPN Co. will be one of the best shoots.
The question is if I had to download the VPN in to my iphone or in to my Raspberry or both.
Got my monitor and keyboard hooked in to my Raspberry and thats the way That I'm doing
the programming files in to my node.
I'm not using SSH at the moment but I communicate to my node via keyboard and a monitor.

I had on the pass a static IP with Verizon that cost me $500.00 but didn't work the way that
I was aspected, if some one give me a better idea
I will appreciate a lot.

I can't wait to use my node on the mobile.
TNX..
N6XPG .. node number 7780...


------------------------------------
Posted by: Dave Gingrich <Dave@dcg.us>
------------------------------------

--- IRLP-Owners YahooGroups List ---
------------------------------------

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Re: hint...

shutle64@...
 

If you are using VPN, you don't need a static ip with the iphone.  Using VPN has it's it own static ip that is visible to the internet from the IRLP node.  The IRLP node will have 2 IP addresses, the local one connected to the iphone, the other is connected to the VPN provider.  The VPN acts like the port forwarding, and you only need it on the IRLP node.  The iphone doesn't need any port forwarding or VPN.  You can choose which ports get forwarded with the VPN provider, or choose OpenVPN.  You can run more than one IRLP node if needed to, just need 2nd VPN account.

John


Re: hint...

shutle64@...
 

If you are using VPN, you don't need a static ip with the iphone.  Using VPN has it's it own static ip that is visible to the internet from the IRLP node.  The IRLP node will have 2 IP addresses, the local one connected to the iphone, the other is connected to the VPN provider.  The VPN acts like the port forwarding, and you only need it on the IRLP node.  The iphone doesn't need any port forwarding or VPN.  You can choose which ports get forwarded with the VPN provider, or choose OpenVPN.  You can run more than one IRLP node if needed to, just need 2nd VPN account.

John


Re: FreedomPop

M M <wa6ilq@...>
 

Comments interspersed in the text...

At 11:45 PM 10/15/2015, you wrote:
On 10/15/2015 07:42 AM, Butch Bussen butchb@shellworld.net [irlp] wrote:
I can't see the pictures, but is this what you're talking about on
amazon? I'll need to link to a node about a half mile from my house
when the cell tower and my repeater go up. I assume these boxes have a
dish antenna on each end? As far as the irlp box is concerned, it is
just a long wire?
Thanks.
http://www.amazon.com/Ubiquiti-900Mhz-NanoBridge-Airmax-Antenna/dp/B00
7PVBXUS/ref=sr_1_1?s=pc&ie=UTF8&qid=1444922859&sr=1-1&keywords=Ubiquit
y+Nano+Bridge+M900.
One trick: bracket the URL's with < and > when you first put them into
the email text. This feature is part of the RFC that defines a URL.
Like this appearance of the above link: <http://www.amazon.com/Ubiquiti-900Mhz-NanoBridge-Airmax-Antenna/dp/B007PVBXUS/ref=sr_1_1?s=pc&ie=UTF8&qid=1444922859&sr=1-1&keywords=Ubiquity+Nano+Bridge+M900>

Yes, that is the item. That is about half what I paid for my units. I
paid about $600 for the pair.

There are three unlicensed models: M2 on the 2.4 ghz wifi band; the M5
on the 5 ghz wifi band, and the M9 on the 900 mhz band. It uses the
wifi protocol, but 900 is not a wifi band. There are also units that
can use licensed spectrum, but that is not a cheap option.
Ubiquity also makes 3.4 GHz stuff for Europe where it is a
commercial band. The USA amateur radio allocations include
3.3-3.5 GHz so the noise level is VERY quiet, and hence can provide
faster speeds and longer-than-expected range.

One problem...I've talked to six USA sellers and nobody stocks
that range equipment or wants to order it in quantities of two units
since only hams can use it - and that means no real sales volume.

One seller I've been told to talk to Canadian dealers or even Ubiquity
direct... but I haven't researched that option yet... As my next need
is at least 6 months from now I've not tried +that+ hard...

The dish clamps to the mast, the electronics box to the dish. There
is an ethernet wire. Ethernet has two data pair, the ethernet wire
has 4 pairs. The extra pairs are used to supply DC to the unit. All
of this is outdoors, and the ethernet wire goes thru a weatherproof
gland into the little box. There are blinking lights on the box, you
may be able to see them from a ways.
Concerning cable...
There is regular Category-5 (AKA CAT-5) and CAT-6
ethernet cable. CAT-6 is higher speed rated cable and
the Ubiquity hardware we are talking about has a throughput
that is quite a bit below 100 MBs... so is fine with CAT-5.
There is regular cable and there is sunlight rated cable (more
expensive)... there is also unshielded and shielded cable...
depending on the RF level you may need the shielded wire.
There is PVC jacketed cable (cheap) and Teflon jacketed
cable (more expensive).

Some neighborhoods and radio sites have rodent problems....
PVC is like candy to certain classes of rodents. Years ago I
was called out to a client that had two buildings separated by
a driveway. They had started out with one and expanded to
the other after several years of growth. They had strung a
steel messenger cable between the buildings and hung two
25-pair telephone cables and about 40 four-pair ethernet cables
from it. I wish that I had a camera with me that day. The rodents
had made a complete mess of all the PVC... every cable had at
least a foot of bare copper exposed to open air. The initial
solution was to replace everything with Teflon wire but the
long term fix was metal conduit. Teflon cable is made for use
in air conditioning plenum areas as PVC generates poison
gas when burned (that is what killed the Apollo 11 astronauts),
but Teflon was useful in that situation as it is ignored by rodents.

So pick your cable according to your needs. I've seen electrical
conduit clamped to tower legs for running non-sunlight-rated
CAT 5 cable up the tower or other antenna support pipe.

Run the cable indoors; it goes to the P.O.E. (power over ethernet
injector). This is a glorified power brick. It has two RJ45 jacks.
One goes to the dish unit; the other to your router etc. The injector
allows you to feed DC over the unused two pairs.
Just for clarification, the POE uses pair 3 and pair 4 by paralleling
the two wires in each of those two pairs and treating them as one
conductor. One pair is positive and the other is negative.

I think it is 24 volts.
The most common POE I've seen is -48v (from the telecom / telephone
world). but some POE is 24v, some is 12v, and some is reversed
polarity.
Check before you buy the POE stuff, or just buy what Ubiquity
says will work. An acquaintance killed a surveillance camera
by using a leftover Cisco POE injector - the camera expected
+24v and he fed it -48v.... the camera went ++poof++.

If you use a long run of cheap ethernet cable,
there will be enough voltage drop to cause trouble. Use the heaviest
gage wire you can obtain. In my case I used a 25 footer, and the POE
injector is immediately indoors. I tried using a cheap 100 footer and
had to abandon it. If you need a longer cable run, you may need to
put the POE in some sort of weathertight enclosure outdoors. A heavy
gage like #20 or #22 wire will probably work to 100 ft; my cheap wire
was #26. I did not need 100 ft, but that is what I had when I started
out.
You can "cheat" on the power over ethernet by not using the
third and fourth pair. Run your own #16, or even #14 wire
(lower resistance-per-100-feet) in parallel with the ethernet
cable and use a cable kit like this:
<http://www.amazon.com/Power-Ethernet-Injector-Splitter-Cable/dp/B00APVQYA4>
The photo is confusing, the round cables in front are power
pigtails that are plugged together. your power cable would
go in line with those pigtails, which are connected to the
3rd and 4th pairs of the RJ45s that go into the equipment
and the POE injector... In other words, put one on one end
and have the pigtail feed your external #16 or #14, mate it
with the other end. The equipment sees the POE
configuration it expects but with less voltage drop.

The units (both ends) come set up for 192.168.1.20. You have to
change one of the units to some other IP. Surf to the .20, enter
the setup mode, and make your changes. I set the second unit
to .21.

You can change the IP to one within your network.
Personally, I have the Ubiquity stuff assigned to an address space
that separate from any traffic it carries... and definitely outside any
DHCP space.

A couple of things.

Let's say you are hooked up to a real IP, like 148.65.77.34. You
can set up your management IP to the 148.65.77.x range, if you
can afford the extra IP's.

An easy way with the above scenario is to use a laptop set up for
ethernet on the 192.168.1.x range, and plug it in when you need to
access the M9's (or M2 or M5).
Another available range is 172.16.x.y through 172.31.x.y
See <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Private_network>

The unit will PASS all IP's since it is a bridge (a looooong ethernet
cable, in effect). However, to access it to setup or manage it, you
have to be able to hit it with the IP it listens on.
Exactly.

There are signal bars and graphs on the management page; you
can fine tune the aim to maximize the signal. Not rocket science.
When you are first aligning the dishes it helps to have someone
on each end, with a laptop hooked to the unit, and some kind of
two way voice communication between them. This way one
person tweaks azimuth and elevation, then turns it over to the
other, who tweaks, then turns it back over to the first, etc. Keep
going for the max signal strength until it tops out.

The dish is metal, feels like steel, and is about 12 x 18. It is quite
sturdy and has stood up to weather up here. I *think* they make a
radome for it out of plastic. I have a radome for an M5 here, but is
rather flimsy the way it attaches. If you have icing, get the radome.
Sometimes they are hard to find. I would weave a wire or some
sort of clamps; heavy duty zip ties, etc so supplement the snaps.
I do not use the radomes on my M9's here.
Stainless steel zip ties are available.

The unit has been up two winters now, and never have had a single
hickup from it. It simply works. The M9 is longer range than the
M5 or M2, but if you are near a cell tower on the 800 range, you
may reconsider the M9. The M2 is nearly hopeless as that band is
clogged with WiFi.
The M5 is said to work 5 or 6 miles, but has to be
optical line of sight, like the M2.
3.3-3.5 GHz equipment - if it could be made available - might
scratch a lot of itches as there is no interference from any WiFi
and a much lower noise floor.

Another trick to find usable microwave paths / channels is to
use a feature called "AirMAX" or "AirView" that is in some of
the Ubiquity stuff. It functions like a spectrum analyzer.
See this: <https://help.ubnt.com/hc/en-us/articles/204950584-airMAX-How-to-use-airView-to-find-the-best-channel->

Background info:
On 2.4 GHz the default channel width is about 22 MHz which
delivers about 50-55 Mbps. The Ubiquity configuration screens
let you assign narrower or wider channels - depending on the
equipment and firmware then options include 80 MHz, 40 MHz,
20 MHz, 10 MHz and 5 MHz. A 10Mhz channel supports about
20-25 Mbps, a 5 MHz wide channel delivers about 10 Mbps.

Narrower channels also "reach" further as the narrower channel
suffers less interference. Note that since the 2.4 GHz band
channel center frequencies are spaced only 5 MHz apart the
only non-overlapping channels are 1 (2401-2423), 6 (2426-2448)
and 11 (2451-2473). Some areas of the globe have two channels
above 11, Japan has three that top out at 2459 MHz..

If your link is only going to carry one IRLP connection plus
some occasional node management traffic then a
5 MHz / 10 Mbps channel will more than fulfill your requirements.

But there is a trick or two that can be done.....

Note that the 2.4 GHZ amateur band is 2390-2450 MHz and
Channel 1starts at 2401 MHz and Channel 6 ends at 2448 MHz.
See <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_WLAN_channels>
and <http://www.radio-electronics.com/info/wireless/wi-fi/80211-channels-number-frequencies-bandwidth.php>
But be careful of that high end, the average microwave oven is
a 1kw free-running power oscillator that operates on or
around 2.45 GHz.

Some equipment has a method to use that 11 MHz below
the bottom edge of channel 1 to gain either two 5 MHz / 10 Mbps
channels or one 10 MHz / 20 Mbps channel. See this web page:
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High-speed_multimedia_radio>
and
<http://www.qsl.net/kb9mwr/projects/wireless/ham-how-to.html>

The M9 will work at reduced
range, and possibly less bandwidth, if there is some obstructions.
Which can be quite useful. Locally there is an amateur group
that has two ROIP (Radio Over IP) hops in 2.4 GHz and one
hop in 900 MHz. The 900 MHz hop actually has enough
refraction over a low ridge line enough to make the hop work
where 2.4 GHz hadn't a chance.

The 5.8 GHz spectrum has WiFi traffic from the newer consumer
equipment where the older equipment was 2.4 GHz only. Some
of that equipment uses both 2.4 and 5.8 in parallel for increased
bandwidth. However that can be affected by other equipment -
if I use my 5.8 GHz Uniden cordless phone near my laptop it
really affects the 5.8 WiFi bandwidth during the call.

(rest snipped for brevity)

Mike WA6ILQ


Re: hint...

Dave K9DC
 

I do not think tethering your iPhone to an IRLP node is very feasible. Even if you arranged for a static public IP on the iPhone (possible with Verizon at least), I do not believe there is a way to get the iPhone itself to forward the necessary ports to the IRLP node.

I have had excellent success using a USB modem with a static public IP from Verizon, on a Cradlepoint router. The Cradlepoint offers several different port forwarding methods. It has an ethernet port and is much less expensive than dedicating an iPhone 6 to your IRLP node 24/7.

I have 2 iPads with Verizon static public IPs on them, but there is no way to turn the iPad into a port forwarding router as far as I know. [Once you pay Verizon the $500, there is no limit on the number of devices you can set up with the feature. So I did it as an exercise just to learn how to set up an iOS device to do that. But honestly, there is little value to me in actually having a static public IP on my iPads.]

If you are willing to pay the $500, I would recommend getting a straight USB modem and a compatible router. But beware, not all modems are compatible with all routers. I am using a Pantech UML290 LTE modem with a Cradlepoint CBR400 and an MBR95 (both discontinued I believe). You can purchase the UML290 all day long on Ebay for around $25.

-k9dc

On Oct 17, 2015, at 13:34, Eli Aguirre omegan6xpg@yahoo.com [irlp] <irlp@yahoogroups.com> wrote:



Hi there node owners:
Name here, Eli Aguirre N6XPG.
I'm new in this fascinating world of irlp and really interesting to know more about it.
Wonder if any body can give me a hint to pair my iphone 6 in to my node, to be able using in
on my mobile.

Some body toll me that getting the format of STONG VPN Co. will be one of the best shoots.
The question is if I had to download the VPN in to my iphone or in to my Raspberry or both.
Got my monitor and keyboard hooked in to my Raspberry and thats the way That I'm doing
the programming files in to my node.
I'm not using SSH at the moment but I communicate to my node via keyboard and a monitor.

I had on the pass a static IP with Verizon that cost me $500.00 but didn't work the way that
I was aspected, if some one give me a better idea
I will appreciate a lot.

I can't wait to use my node on the mobile.
TNX..
N6XPG .. node number 7780...


hint...

Eli Aguirre <omegan6xpg@...>
 

Hi there node owners:
Name here, Eli Aguirre N6XPG.
I'm new in this fascinating world of irlp and really interesting to know more about it.
Wonder if any body can give me a hint to pair my iphone 6 in to my node, to be able using in 
on my mobile.  

Some body toll me that getting the format of STONG VPN Co. will be one of the best shoots.
The question is if I had to download the VPN in to my iphone or in to my Raspberry or both.
Got my monitor and keyboard hooked in to my Raspberry and thats the way That I'm doing
the programming files in to my node.
 I'm not using SSH  at the moment but I communicate to my node via keyboard and a monitor.

I had on the pass a static IP with Verizon that cost me $500.00 but didn't work the way that
I was aspected, if some one give me a better idea 
I will appreciate a lot.

I can't wait to use my node on the mobile.
TNX..
N6XPG .. node number 7780...


Re: FreedomPop

Steve, KB9MWR
 

I think the public IP thing is going to be Dependent on the area and carrier providing the actual service.  Mine is a fully operational Sierra Wireless 803S on the Sprint network. Public IP, port forwarding, DMZ, WPA2 AES encryption, etc.   So this would work just fine for IRLP.


Re: FreedomPop

Ramon Gandia
 

On 10/16/2015 06:22 AM, Butch Bussen butchb@shellworld.net [irlp] wrote:
Thanks very much. I'll certainly keep this note. A lot of great info
there. I hadn't thought about the 900 and cell thing. It is viero, I
really don't know when the tower will go up.
Usually the 800 band is used by AT&T, most newer setups and licenses are
going up on the 1.7 ghz range ... and up. My guess is the M9 will work
fine, maybe even on the tower. Nothing lost in trying.

Cell 3G and 4G are up there in the 1.7 and up range.

--
/|&#92;
Ramon Gandia AL7X
Nome, Alaska USA


Re: FreedomPop

Butch Bussen
 

Thanks very much. I'll certainly keep this note. A lot of great info there. I hadn't thought about the 900 and cell thing. It is viero, I really don't know when the tower will go up. I sold them an acre of ground with the provision I could put a repeater antenna on the tower, but all of my stuff will be outside the building in a weather proof box of some kind. I live in a small town and the tower is just north of town, maybe a half mile. I'll have to get high enough here to get over trees and houses, not sure what I'll be able to do at their site. I figured this would be a great way to get the node on my repeater there, is now at my house here. Thanks again for your nice reply.
73
Butch
WA0VJR
Node 3148
Wallace, ks.


Re: FreedomPop

Ramon Gandia
 

On 10/15/2015 07:42 AM, Butch Bussen butchb@shellworld.net [irlp] wrote:
I can't see the pictures, but is this what you're talking about on
amazon? I'll need to link to a node about a half mile from my house
when the cell tower and my repeater go up. I assume these boxes have a
dish antenna on each end? As far as the irlp box is concerned, it is
just a long wire?
Thanks.
http://www.amazon.com/Ubiquiti-900Mhz-NanoBridge-Airmax-Antenna/dp/B007PVBXUS/ref=sr_1_1?s=pc&ie=UTF8&qid=1444922859&sr=1-1&keywords=Ubiquity+Nano+Bridge+M900.
Yes, that is the item. That is about half what I paid for my units. I paid about $600 for the pair.

There are three unlicensed models: M2 on the 2.4 ghz wifi band; the M5 on the 5 ghz wifi band, and the M9 on the 900 mhz band. It uses the
wifi protocol, but 900 is not a wifi band. There are also units that
can use licensed spectrum, but that is not a cheap option.

The dish clamps to the mast, the electronics box to the dish. There
is an ethernet wire. Ethernet has two data pair, the ethernet wire
has 4 pairs. The extra pairs are used to supply DC to the unit. All
of this is outdoors, and the ethernet wire goes thru a weatherproof
gland into the little box. There are blinking lights on the box, you
may be able to see them from a ways.

Run the cable indoors; it goes to the P.O.E. (power over ethernet injector). This is a glorified power brick. It has two RJ45 jacks.
One goes to the dish unit; the other to your router etc. The injector
allows you to feed DC over the unused two pairs.

I think it is 24 volts. If you use a long run of cheap ethernet cable,
there will be enough voltage drop to cause trouble. Use the heaviest
gage wire you can obtain. In my case I used a 25 footer, and the POE
injector is immediately indoors. I tried using a cheap 100 footer and
had to abandon it. If you need a longer cable run, you may need to
put the POE in some sort of weathertight enclosure outdoors. A heavy
gage like #20 or #22 wire will probably work to 100 ft; my cheap wire
was #26. I did not need 100 ft, but that is what I had when I started
out.

The units (both ends) come set up for 192.168.1.20. You have to change
one of the units to some other IP. Surf to the .20, enter the setup
mode, and make your changes. I set the second unit to .21.

You can change the IP to one within your network.

A couple of things.

Let's say you are hooked up to a real IP, like 148.65.77.34. You can
set up your management IP to the 148.65.77.x range, if you can afford
the extra IP's.

An easy way with the above scenario is to use a laptop set up for
ethernet on the 192.168.1.x range, and plug it in when you need to
access the M9's (or M2 or M5).

The unit will PASS all IP's since it is a bridge (a looooong ethernet
cable, in effect). However, to access it to setup or manage it, you
have to be able to hit it with the IP it listens on.

There are signal bars and graphs on the management page; you can fine
tune the aim to maximize the signal. Not rocket science.

The dish is metal, feels like steel, and is about 12 x 18. It is quite
sturdy and has stood up to weather up here. I *think* they make a
radome for it out of plastic. I have a radome for an M5 here, but is
rather flimsy the way it attaches. If you have icing, get the radome.
Sometimes they are hard to find. I would weave a wire or some sort of
clamps; heavy duty zip ties, etc so supplement the snaps. I do not use
the radomes on my M9's here.

The unit has been up two winters now, and never have had a single
hickup from it. It simply works. The M9 is longer range than the
M5 or M2, but if you are near a cell tower on the 800 range, you
may reconsider the M9. The M2 is nearly hopeless as that band is
clogged with WiFi. The M5 is said to work 5 or 6 miles, but has to be
optical line of sight, like the M2. The M9 will work at reduced
range, and possibly less bandwidth, if there is some obstructions.

In my case, it would be optical line of sight, but there is a metal
building we cannot have the path clear by about 30 feet. Still got
perfect throughput. 4.3 miles.

You should be aware that the distance limitation on WiFi protocal has
nothing to do with path or signal strength. It has to do with the fact
that the packets are launched, and a reply has to come back within so
many nanoseconds or the packet is assumed lost. It is possible to
sometimes hack this parameter to allow 100 miles; the M9 is proprietary,
not open source, so that is not an option, at least not out of the
box.

As radio hams, we are allowed use of the 902-928 band with up to 1.5KW
and unlimited antenna size. Keep that in mind. ALL IRLP traffic is
non commercial ham, by definition, so the M9 could be hacked out of spec, with giant dishes (think satellite dishes), power amps, etc.,
and would be a lot of fun, but also is somewhat beyond what we want to
do here in the IRLP group. If I lived in Hawaii and had to span
two islands ... it would be interesting. There are other units that
are better suited for long range stuff. This M9 will do 16 miles or
so. At that point you run into the nanosecond thing and the connection
abruptly drops. No matter how good the signal is.

Many mountaintops are within this distance of a valley location that
has internet access, and that is a good way to get an ethernet wire
out 16 miles at very little cost. Specially if the cost is shared
among the users at the mountaintop.

You could set up a pair of M9's back to back to get 32 miles, etc.,
but your bandwidth will drop to less than half doing that.

In my case, at the Cafe end (where the cable box modem is) I have an
N16 router with Tomato Firmware with bandwidth management and logging
per IP/MAC. I can thus make sure no one user, WiFi or ethernet, uses
more bandwidth than they are supposed to. Keeps my teenaged grandaughter's downloads from maxing out the connection.

The worse are Apple products as they do updates automatically and
download a Gig at a clip ($8 to $20 per GB up here). Facetime and
Skype will also use all the bandwidth they want until the connection
flattens out. They also change ports and protocols, even Port 53
DNS, etc., to get around blockages. Very nasty and not network
friendly. The Tomato firmware takes care of these handily.

If you have a dedicated connection, none of this is an issue. In my
case, I provide internet to my home/cabin; the IRLP at the repeater,
and to the Polar Cafe customers. Those are the ones that bear
watching or 'they' will watch full definition movies if you let them!

Getting internet via the cell 3G or 4G/LTE is good if you can get
a routable IP with no port blockage. Port 80 can be configure around
in the IRLP setup. Many ISP's will also block port 25 (mail server),
but that port is not used in IRLP.

Look into the M2, M5 or M9 by Ubiquity and see if it would solve some
of your problems.

--
/|&#92;
Ramon Gandia AL7X
Nome, Alaska USA


Re: Silent enable/disable

Thomas H <kf9js@...>
 

Hi Tony,

I have it set to delete and re-create the /home/irlp/local/enable file, as K9DC suggested.

Thomas KF9JS #8092


To: irlp@...
From: irlp@...
Date: Tue, 13 Oct 2015 20:53:54 -0700
Subject: Re: [irlp] Silent enable/disable

 
On 10/12/2015 10:58 AM, Thomas H kf9js@... [irlp] wrote:


Thanks for your response. I have now added a cron job which will disable the node at night and enable in the morning. ...

As user "repeater" I'm sure you'll remember to source "." the environment file before the disable/enable commands, as the variables defined there are needed in the disable/enable scripts, e.g. to disable at 21:00 local time (9 pm) and enable at 05:30 (coffee time):

0 21 * * * . /home/irlp/custom/environment; /home/irlp/scripts/disable
30 5 * * * . /home/irlp/custom/environment; /home/irlp/scripts/enable


Re: FreedomPop

Teton Amateur Radio Repeater Association (TARRA)
 

I use a NanoStation M2 for my internet to my wireless ISP here in town. Most likely the one site would have to be about a 10 - 12 mile run. I really wouldn't want to try a dish at the repeater site. I would be pretty sure that one wouldn't hold up.

Mick - W7CAT
Node 3464

----- Original Message -----
From: "dcameron@... [irlp]"
To:
Sent: Thursday, October 15, 2015 07:36:53 AM
Subject: Re: [irlp] FreedomPop

> I can second the use of the Ubiquiti equipment. My repeaters have been fed internet from the University below via a pair of NanoBridge M5 radios. They run at the lowest power and lowest throughput, and I run nodes 1000 and 1010 off of them. Only failure I have had was when roofers disconncted the cable by accident.
>
> Another pair of M5 units run a 5 mile link between another ham group's tweo repeater sites. If you have to go farther, look at the Rocket radios and dishes.
>
> David Cameron

--

Be sure to check out all the latest at our web site and look at our repeater sites! IRLP Node 3464



Re: FreedomPop

Teton Amateur Radio Repeater Association (TARRA)
 

It will be very interesting to know what you find out with this.

Mick - W7CAT

----- Original Message -----
From: "kb9mwr@... [irlp]"
To:
Sent: Wednesday, October 14, 2015 10:42:47 PM
Subject: Re: [irlp] FreedomPop

> http://www.natecarlson.com/2012/10/04/review-freedompops-free-4g-hotspot/ http://www.natecarlson.com/2012/10/04/review-freedompops-free-4g-hotspot/
> I have one on order. If I find anything different that reported above I will report back. Else a VPN might work if for some reason you don't get a public IP.
>
> http://wiki.ampr.org/index.php/AMPRNet_VPN http://wiki.ampr.org/index.php/AMPRNet_VPN
>

--

Be sure to check out all the latest at our web site and look at our repeater sites! IRLP Node 3464



Re: FreedomPop

Butch Bussen
 

I can't see the pictures, but is this what you're talking about on amazon? I'll need to link to a node about a half mile from my house when the cell tower and my repeater go up. I assume these boxes have a dish antenna on each end? As far as the irlp box is concerned, it is just a long wire?
Thanks.
http://www.amazon.com/Ubiquiti-900Mhz-NanoBridge-Airmax-Antenna/dp/B007PVBXUS/ref=sr_1_1?s=pc&ie=UTF8&qid=1444922859&sr=1-1&keywords=Ubiquity+Nano+Bridge+M900.

73
Butch
WA0VJR
Node 3148
Wallace, ks.

On Wed, 14 Oct 2015, Ramon Gandia rfg8yg@xalaska.com [irlp] wrote:

I should mention that if what you need is internet at the 3464 site,
that you simply put in a Microwave Link from the town to the site.

Line of sight; and looks like about 4 or 5 miles.

You can do this easily with a Ubiquity Nano Bridge M900. Works at
900 ( they have 2.4, 5 ghz and licensed ones too). The M900 is
rated 13 miles, and if shorter distance can stand not being quite
line of sight.

I use it regularly here at my home. I am 4.1 microwave miles from
the downtown site. It is barely not line of sight, but I still
get the 54 mbps connection.

It is a bridge, not a router. So behaves like a 4.1 mile long
ethernet cable, no IP address issues. You manage it via an IP
address you can set, but the IP range for that has nothing to do
with what it passes as a bridge.

Pick up an internet hookup in town, aim the little dishes (about
18 inchers) and ... beam me up, Scotty!.

Check out my web site for a picture of this:
http://www.xalaska.com
look on the right hand column for "RAM Metro: Polar Cafe Site"
First picture there clearly shows the M900 link.

Cost is very affordable. Amazon has them, I think under $200
a pair, and is dead simple to set up.

Also consider that because 900 is a ham band, you can opt to
use it under ham rules instead of unlicensed. That gives you
options on amplifiers and antennas. However, out of the box
it is an excellent unit. Mine has been exposed to Alaska
marine coastal weather, salt, winds, rain, snow, ice, and never
a glitch. Uptime is 2 years or more without reboot.

--
/|&#92;
Ramon Gandia AL7X
Nome, Alaska USA

8121 - 8140 of 78813