Topics

Dual Wan Router


Bob Hess
 

I host two different Wireless ISP's on my towers at the house.  As a result, I have multiple WAN IP addresses and host three nodes here.

I recent got a Ubiquity dual-WAN router.  I have the Ubiquity router set up for load-sharing.  The other option is fail-over.  With load sharing, I have increased bandwidth and seamless redundancy.  With the understanding that I am not a networking guru, I have two questions:

1 - I can set up port-forwarding in the router for each WAN.  If I operate a node on the LAN, can I use the same port-forwarding criteria on each WAN to achieve redundancy should one WAN fail?

 - OR - 

2 - Can I operate two nodes on the LAN, assuming each node has a unique static IP, with the port-forwarding set up such that WAN A points to Node 1 and WAN B points to node 2?

Hope this makes sense.  Thanks in advance for any responses.

Bob
W1RH


David Cameron - IRLP
 

A dual wan router set up for load balancing will NOT work with IRLP. The issue is that the source IP of the packets keeps changing. When that happens your node will stop working on the current call, and will not be able to be called. Plus it puts a huge strain on the dynamic IP system as the servers have to keep updating your IP as it flops between the two WANs.

You need to set up one on one WAN and two on the other. If you have multiple connections, just add a switch to both before feeding the dual WAN system. Then you don't need port forwarding - just assign the nodes specific static IPs on one WAN or the other.

Dave Cameron

On 2019-12-05 13:30, Bob Hess via Groups.Io wrote:
I host two different Wireless ISP's on my towers at the house. As a
result, I have multiple WAN IP addresses and host three nodes here.
I recent got a Ubiquity dual-WAN router. I have the Ubiquity router
set up for load-sharing. The other option is fail-over. With load
sharing, I have increased bandwidth and seamless redundancy. With the
understanding that I am not a networking guru, I have two questions:
1 - I can set up port-forwarding in the router for each WAN. If I
operate a node on the LAN, can I use the same port-forwarding criteria
on each WAN to achieve redundancy should one WAN fail?
- OR -
2 - Can I operate two nodes on the LAN, assuming each node has a
unique static IP, with the port-forwarding set up such that WAN A
points to Node 1 and WAN B points to node 2?
Hope this makes sense. Thanks in advance for any responses.
Bob
W1RH
Links:
------
[1] https://irlp.groups.io/g/IRLP/message/76370
[2] https://groups.io/mt/67221548/500965
[3] https://irlp.groups.io/g/IRLP/post
[4] https://irlp.groups.io/g/IRLP/editsub/500965
[5] https://irlp.groups.io/g/IRLP/leave/defanged


k9dc
 

This also could be a case where IRLP VPN might help.

First of all, each node would be uniquely IP addressed (VPN on both), so no port forwarding would be required at all, any number of nodes can use the same WAN connection. If your node is running Debian 9 or 10, the VPN will usually survive a change in the underlying IP address, so your failover scenario should work with nearly no interruption.

I use that setup myself. I have gigabit fiber service with a cellular router as backup. If the fiber fails, it instantly switches over to the cellular connection. Two of my nodes are running Debian 9, they always survive the flip to backup. I also have a lab node which is a nanonode. Unfortunately the nano nodes run Debian 7, which requires a reboot if the Internet ever drops.

IRLP VPN might help you out. https://irlp.groups.io/g/IRLP/files/IRLP%20VPN%20Service

-k9dc

On Dec 5, 2019, at 16:48, David Cameron - IRLP <dcameron@...> wrote:

A dual wan router set up for load balancing will NOT work with IRLP. The issue is that the source IP of the packets keeps changing. When that happens your node will stop working on the current call, and will not be able to be called. Plus it puts a huge strain on the dynamic IP system as the servers have to keep updating your IP as it flops between the two WANs.

You need to set up one on one WAN and two on the other. If you have multiple connections, just add a switch to both before feeding the dual WAN system. Then you don't need port forwarding - just assign the nodes specific static IPs on one WAN or the other.

Dave Cameron

On 2019-12-05 13:30, Bob Hess via Groups.Io wrote:
I host two different Wireless ISP's on my towers at the house. As a
result, I have multiple WAN IP addresses and host three nodes here.
I recent got a Ubiquity dual-WAN router. I have the Ubiquity router
set up for load-sharing. The other option is fail-over. With load
sharing, I have increased bandwidth and seamless redundancy. With the
understanding that I am not a networking guru, I have two questions:
1 - I can set up port-forwarding in the router for each WAN. If I
operate a node on the LAN, can I use the same port-forwarding criteria
on each WAN to achieve redundancy should one WAN fail?
- OR -
2 - Can I operate two nodes on the LAN, assuming each node has a
unique static IP, with the port-forwarding set up such that WAN A
points to Node 1 and WAN B points to node 2?
Hope this makes sense. Thanks in advance for any responses.
Bob
W1RH


Bob Hess
 

Thanks for the quick response gentlemen.

Bob
W1RH


k9dc
 

I also agree with Dave, load sharing will not work well. While the VPN usually survives most IP changes, it does expect reasonable stability with the connection. I would only use the dual wan setup in a failover configuration.

-k9dc

On Dec 5, 2019, at 17:24, k9dc <Dave@...> wrote:


This also could be a case where IRLP VPN might help.

First of all, each node would be uniquely IP addressed (VPN on both), so no port forwarding would be required at all, any number of nodes can use the same WAN connection. If your node is running Debian 9 or 10, the VPN will usually survive a change in the underlying IP address, so your failover scenario should work with nearly no interruption.

I use that setup myself. I have gigabit fiber service with a cellular router as backup. If the fiber fails, it instantly switches over to the cellular connection. Two of my nodes are running Debian 9, they always survive the flip to backup. I also have a lab node which is a nanonode. Unfortunately the nano nodes run Debian 7, which requires a reboot if the Internet ever drops.

IRLP VPN might help you out. https://irlp.groups.io/g/IRLP/files/IRLP%20VPN%20Service

-k9dc

On Dec 5, 2019, at 16:48, David Cameron - IRLP <dcameron@...> wrote:

A dual wan router set up for load balancing will NOT work with IRLP. The issue is that the source IP of the packets keeps changing. When that happens your node will stop working on the current call, and will not be able to be called. Plus it puts a huge strain on the dynamic IP system as the servers have to keep updating your IP as it flops between the two WANs.

You need to set up one on one WAN and two on the other. If you have multiple connections, just add a switch to both before feeding the dual WAN system. Then you don't need port forwarding - just assign the nodes specific static IPs on one WAN or the other.

Dave Cameron

On 2019-12-05 13:30, Bob Hess via Groups.Io wrote:
I host two different Wireless ISP's on my towers at the house. As a
result, I have multiple WAN IP addresses and host three nodes here.
I recent got a Ubiquity dual-WAN router. I have the Ubiquity router
set up for load-sharing. The other option is fail-over. With load
sharing, I have increased bandwidth and seamless redundancy. With the
understanding that I am not a networking guru, I have two questions:
1 - I can set up port-forwarding in the router for each WAN. If I
operate a node on the LAN, can I use the same port-forwarding criteria
on each WAN to achieve redundancy should one WAN fail?
- OR -
2 - Can I operate two nodes on the LAN, assuming each node has a
unique static IP, with the port-forwarding set up such that WAN A
points to Node 1 and WAN B points to node 2?
Hope this makes sense. Thanks in advance for any responses.
Bob
W1RH