Topics

GEOstationary ham band satellite for the Americas.

KC9SGV
 



Hi All,
How would a ham band GEOstationary satellite over the Americas help IRLP ?
Question: Could IRLP use the satellite in it's system ?
See more at the GEO .IO Group.
https://groups.io/g/GEO

Ramon Gandia
 

On 10/4/19 8:00 AM, KC9SGV wrote:
Hi All,
How would a ham band GEOstationary satellite over the Americas help IRLP ?
Question: Could IRLP use the satellite in it's system ?
See more at the GEO .IO Group.
https://groups.io/g/GEO
_._,_._,_
The present proposal is to RENT commercial downlink on the 12ghz band.
The UPLINK would be via the internet to a commercial aggregator.
Total BW would be 1 mHz.

The idea of repurposing an older commercial satellite, or better yet,
build a ham transponder that can ride on a commercial satellite has
a lot of merit.

THIS particular idea is not ham radio at all. Here is how you can tell:
You do not need a ham license to get on the proposed system. All you
need is a connection from your phone to the commercial aggregator. I
am sure the proponents would try to restrict the incoming stuff. But
let's say some Search and Rescue wants to use it? With non-ham ops?

The Uplink and Downlink should be via ham radio r.f. That would need
you to put up a satellite dish, but on a ham satellite band. Say,
for instance, 10ghz up, 24 ghz down.

I do not know if any senescent transponders can be retuned to a ham
frequency; but I think including this capability into a new satellite
should be fairly straightforward.

For IRLP I can see this working if the satellite uplink via
commercial aggregator, and the proposed downlink uses an ACCOUNT
held by some IRLP reflector or node. This is no different than
the present system of tying things together with commercial internet.

The latency of both systems added together would cause some
issues. For a while many of us here in Alaska had (in some cases
still have) satellite internet. It worked and was terrible.



--
/|\
Ramon Gandia AL7X
Nome, Alaska USA

KC9SGV
 

Hi Ramon,
Of course we all want ham frequencies up and down all the way.
It will cost ~$5mil to get one 6U cubesat up to GEO, and years of R&D.
In the mean time, while we wait, we can rent GEO bandwidth for $2000/month/MHz.
Donation, or grant from a served agency for Emcomm use.
Maybe from a favorite benefactor....
It will give us experience with aggregators, and microwave receiving systems.
HF is really bad here nowadays, and I suppose very bad under Aurora.

Bernard,
KC9SGV

On Oct 4, 2019, at 1:44 PM, Ramon Gandia <rfg8yg@...> wrote:

On 10/4/19 8:00 AM, KC9SGV wrote:
Hi All,
How would a ham band GEOstationary satellite over the Americas help IRLP ?
Question: Could IRLP use the satellite in it's system ?
See more at the GEO .IO Group.
https://groups.io/g/GEO
_._,_._,_
The present proposal is to RENT commercial downlink on the 12ghz band.
The UPLINK would be via the internet to a commercial aggregator.
Total BW would be 1 mHz.

The idea of repurposing an older commercial satellite, or better yet,
build a ham transponder that can ride on a commercial satellite has
a lot of merit.

THIS particular idea is not ham radio at all. Here is how you can tell:
You do not need a ham license to get on the proposed system. All you
need is a connection from your phone to the commercial aggregator. I
am sure the proponents would try to restrict the incoming stuff. But
let's say some Search and Rescue wants to use it? With non-ham ops?

The Uplink and Downlink should be via ham radio r.f. That would need
you to put up a satellite dish, but on a ham satellite band. Say,
for instance, 10ghz up, 24 ghz down.

I do not know if any senescent transponders can be retuned to a ham
frequency; but I think including this capability into a new satellite
should be fairly straightforward.

For IRLP I can see this working if the satellite uplink via
commercial aggregator, and the proposed downlink uses an ACCOUNT
held by some IRLP reflector or node. This is no different than
the present system of tying things together with commercial internet.

The latency of both systems added together would cause some
issues. For a while many of us here in Alaska had (in some cases
still have) satellite internet. It worked and was terrible.



--
/|\
Ramon Gandia AL7X
Nome, Alaska USA


n7bfs
 

Maybe you meant geo-synchronous satellite?
Geo-stationary would mean annoying tracking of the satellite as it's not 'following' the earth, whereas geo-synchronous -is- following the earth (to a greater extent at high earth orbit) and only requires minimal tracking corrections.
It's what we all had hoped AO-40 wouid have been but because of it's failure I don't recall there being another amateur satellite like it having been launched since (I've been out of touch with hamsat news for a while)...

I'd love to see a high earth orbit geo-synch satellite launched but cost for ham purposes is pretty prohibitive unless we win the lottery.

73
Doug
N7BFS

KC9SGV
 

No, I meant GEOstationary.
For the largest, most useful, global footprint.


KC9SGV


On Oct 5, 2019, at 12:39 PM, n7bfs <doug.n7bfs@...> wrote:

Maybe you meant geo-synchronous satellite?
Geo-stationary would mean annoying tracking of the satellite as it's not 'following' the earth, whereas geo-synchronous -is- following the earth (to a greater extent at high earth orbit) and only requires minimal tracking corrections.
It's what we all had hoped AO-40 wouid have been but because of it's failure I don't recall there being another amateur satellite like it having been launched since (I've been out of touch with hamsat news for a while)...

I'd love to see a high earth orbit geo-synch satellite launched but cost for ham purposes is pretty prohibitive unless we win the lottery.

73
Doug
N7BFS

n7bfs
 

Thanks for the clarification of what your desire was, for some reason I got the impression you were desiring a LEO...

73
Doug